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Here’s How Much to Tip Hotel Housekeeping



    Hotel guests often interact with a number of staffers ― from valets to bellhops to lobby bartenders. And in these exchanges, it’s common knowledge to tip them accordingly.

    But there’s one staff category that is often ignored in the tip department due to the fact that the labor often requires less face-to-face time: housekeeping.

    “I must admit my ignorance,” life etiquette expert Juliet Mitchell, also known as Ms. J, told HuffPost. “When I first started traveling and staying in hotels, I didn’t know that you should tip the housekeeping staff. This, for many, is truly a faux pas borne out of ignorance.”

    In 2017, The New York Times reported that fewer than a third of hotel guests leave tips for housekeeping staff. And even if they do tip, they may not realize that it’s important to do so for each day of their stay.

    To help explain the rules around tipping hotel housekeepers, HuffPost spoke to a few etiquette experts. Read on for their guidance.

    Why it’s important to tip housekeeping staff

    “You may occasionally pass hotel housekeepers in the hallways, but you rarely see how incredibly hard they work,” Jodi R.R. Smith, president of Mannersmith Etiquette Consulting, told HuffPost. “Rooms must be cleaned, carpets vacuumed, sheets changed, beds made, towels refreshed, bathrooms wiped and trash cans emptied. All of this must be done without disturbing the guests or their belongings — and in a short, and often timed, duration.”

    The job is also more precarious than you might think. Housekeepers experience the highest injury rates in the industry due to the physically demanding and time-sensitive nature of their work, according to Unite Here, a labor union that represents more than 100,000 hotel workers in North America. Housekeepers also face additional risk of sexual harassment and assault, as the job generally entails working alone in strangers’ rooms.

    Following the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, many hotels have enhanced their cleaning protocols, which means additional disinfecting tasks for housekeepers. Meanwhile, labor shortages have led to reduced staffing amid a renewed demand for travel. Despite all of this, housekeepers remain some of the lowest-paid employees in the operation.

    Why you should do it every day

    The standard for hotel housekeeping is to tip every day to ensure the money is going to the specific person servicing your room.

    “Because housekeeping is a 24/7 position, there are many teams that work in concert to keep each room clean,” Smith said. “There is no guarantee that the housekeeper who cleaned earlier in your stay will be the same one cleaning your room when you check out.”

    If you wait until the end of your stay to tip or leave it all at the beginning, you risk shortchanging workers.

    “Imagine you are on vacation for a week,” Smith said. “One housekeeper may have kept your room for the first five days. Then the next housekeeper kept your room for two, yet receives the tip for all seven.”

    Many hotels have changed their cleaning procedures and amenities during the pandemic.

    Willie B. Thomas via Getty Images

    Many hotels have changed their cleaning procedures and amenities during the pandemic.

    During the pandemic, many hotels have switched to an opt-in system for daily room cleaning due to health guidelines and labor shortages. As a result, some guests might think there’s no need to tip housekeepers.

    But even if you never opt for room cleaning during your stay, you should leave a tip on your departure day, as housekeeping staff will be coming in to clean up after you and disinfect the room before the next guests arrive. With staffing shortages and enhanced cleaning procedures, it’s even more important to show your appreciation for their work.

    How much money to leave

    The standard amount for housekeeping is $1 to $5 per day, according to a tipping guide from the American Hotel and Lodging Association. But with the ongoing pandemic, Unite Here suggested leaving at least $5.

    “Tip graciously. There is no set minimum gratuity but if there was ever a time to show generosity and respect, this is it,” said Diane Gottsman, an etiquette expert, the author of “Modern Etiquette for a Better Life” and the founder of The Protocol School of Texas.

    “$5 to $10 a day is greatly appreciated, depending on the selection of hotel that you stay,” she added. “The more elaborate the hotel, the more you will want to leave based on the overall price point.”

    Smith noted that tip amounts depend on factors such as the geographic location, length of stay, number of people per room and additional requests.

    “A very general guideline is $3 to $5 per person per day,” she said. “In five-star venues located in high-rent districts such as New York, Los Angeles and Chicago, the guideline is $5 to $10 per person per day. When in doubt, always round up. It may be a few extra dollars for you, but can mean so much to those doing the labor.”

    The AHLA advised placing the money in an envelope with a note to make it clear it’s for housekeeping. Smith believes the best location to put it is on the bed near the pillow.

    What else to keep in mind

    Courtesy toward housekeepers doesn’t end at tipping.

    “Remember that a real person is coming in to pick up your mess,” Gottsman said. “Show respect for the person who is keeping your room clean. Throw trash in the container rather than on the floor. Observe special requests such as leaving your towels in a particular place if that’s what the hotel requests.”

    She also recommended asking workers at the front desk if they can accommodate your request for items such as robes, as housekeeping staff is more limited.

    Civility expert and “Everyday Etiquette” author Patricia Rossi emphasized that showing consideration for hotel staff with tips and courtesy is mutually beneficial, not only in terms of service provided but also in terms of spreading positivity in difficult times.

    “It’s giving back a tiny deposit of goodness for the good that was done for you,” she said. “It shows appreciation, gratitude and respect, and it will boost your heart and theirs.”

    FAQs

    How Much to Tip Hotel Housekeeping in 2022 – Reader's Digest

    Here’s How Much to Tip Hotel Housekeeping Etiquette experts reveal tipping advice for hotel stays, including when, how, and how much to tip housekeeping. Travel planning is all about the details. But while you may be a master at uncovering the cleanest hotels and practicing proper airplane etiquette, there’s an element of being a guest that stumps even the savviest of travelers. Tipping etiquette—who to tip, when and how to do it, and how much of a tip to give—can be confusing. Never mind the fact that it often involves complicated mental math. And nothing is as befuddling as figuring out how much to tip housekeeping in hotels, motels, extended stays, and Airbnbs. You can figure out how much you know about tipping etiquette by taking this quiz. The fact is, tipping rules aren’t as clear-cut here as they are in other circumstances. “Unlike waitstaff that is always tipped between 15 and 20 percent, this is one area of tipping that is not calculated by any percentage,” says Julia Esteve Boyd, an etiquette consultant who has worked with royal families, politicians, and business executives. To help you understand how much to tip, we turned to the pros. Our etiquette experts answered all of the questions you’ve been afraid to ask—and perhaps some you haven’t even thought of yet. How the pandemic has changed tipping The COVID-19 pandemic changed hotel stays, and it has significantly altered tipping etiquette in many situations, including in hospitality, says Toni Dupree, certified etiquette coach, CEO of Etiquette & Style by Dupree, author of Whose Fork is it Anyway?, and etiquette columnist for MVMNT magazine. Housekeepers have been hit doubly hard: Not only have they had their hours and tips reduced due to fewer people traveling, but they now have increased cleaning and sanitizing protocols. Plus, they have the added worry of having to be in small spaces where there may be lots of germs. Do you have to tip housekeeping? The answer is a resounding yes. The people who clean and take care of your room during your stay, clean and sanitize it between customers, and answer the sorts of things you really shouldn’t be asking hotel staff are essential workers. Yet many people forget or overlook this portion of the service industry. This is a big problem, as these workers depend on tips, says Dupree. Tips for hospitality workers aren’t just nice—they’re necessary income. How much to tip housekeeping The general rule for how much to tip housekeeping is to give housekeepers a minimum of $3 to $5 dollars a day, says Lisa Grotts, a certified etiquette professional, founder of Golden Rules Gal, former director of protocol for the city and county of San Francisco, and author of several books on etiquette. This is the same for hotels, motels, and extended-stay hotels, as they all have regular room cleanings. When packing up at the end of your stay, keep in mind which things you can and can’t take from your hotel room. rd.comTipping housekeeping during COVID-19 Considering the extra work the housekeeping staff is doing to keep you safe and healthy, you might want to tip more generously than you might otherwise, Dupree says. And keep in mind that although you may see housekeeping less in the day-to-day operations—cleanings may be limited to minimize possible COVID-19 exposure—that’s no reason to reduce or skip a tip….

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    How Much Do You Tip Hotel Housekeeping? – NerdWallet

    How Much Do You Tip Hotel Housekeeping? – NerdWalletWhen planning a trip, travelers tally up all the major expenses — plane tickets, rental car, hotel, dining. But there’s one expense some vacationers overlook: tipping hotel housekeepers.Unlike a restaurant server or the hotel parking valet, where face-to-face interaction between guests and the staff prompts a tip for a service, hotel housekeepers usually work sight unseen.This might be why a Cornell University study found that respondents don’t feel obligated to tip hotel housekeepers, compared to bartenders or hotel bell staff. But tipping these essential hotel staff members is an important part of travel etiquette to factor into your next trip.Here’s what travelers need to know about tipping hotel housekeeping staff.Guide to tipping hotel housekeeping staffThere’s no hard-and-fast rule on how much to tip hotel housekeeping, but there are best practices you can adhere to when it comes to expressing your gratitude.The recommended tipping rangeThe American Hotel & Lodging Association suggests leaving a $1-to-$5 tip per day for the housekeeping staff. The tipping range is helpful when estimating your trip budget, but how much you should ultimately tip depends on a few factors (more on this later).When to tip your hotel housekeeperSome guests leave a lump-sum tip on the last day of their stay, but a better practice is doling out incremental tips daily, as hotel housekeepers might have different day-to-day room assignments. A daily tip more closely ensures your gratitude goes to the specific worker who services the room each day.Cash is kingWhen leaving hotel housekeeping tips, cash is preferred. Other forms of gratuity — like food, leftover alcohol or gambling tokens — may be a well-meaning gesture. However, some hotel policies restrict what housekeeping staff can accept.For example, if you’re staying at a Las Vegas hotel, you might want to leave casino chips or an electronic slot machine voucher as a tip for housekeeping, but state gaming regulations prohibit housekeepers from accepting them. Further, some hotels have strict no-gambling policies for their staff, which puts housekeepers in a difficult position when redeeming vouchers or casino chips for cash.How to leave tips for housekeepingMake sure the tip is visible, like on the dresser or next to the bathroom sink. Avoid leaving your housekeeping tips on the bed or nightstand, as these areas risk your cash getting jostled around or lost when bed sheets are changed.🤓Nerdy TipLeave your tip on top of, or next to, a thank you note. This makes it very clear that the cash is a tip meant for the housekeeper and reduces the risk of misunderstanding.How much to tip housekeepingThe amount you leave to show gratitude for your hotel housekeeper’s service depends on the specifics of your stay. How much do you tip hotel housekeeping? Should you go above and beyond the recommended tipping range of $1 to $5 per day? Consider the following.Number of occupants. If you’re traveling with family or a group, account for the extra cleaning the housekeeper needs to do. For example, extra sheets and blankets to replace, plus more trash to clear out. Consider adding an additional $1 tip per person on top of your base tip.Room type. How much time a housekeeper spends tidying up your room also depends on your room’s size and amenities. If you’ve booked a room with a kitchenette, for example, housekeeping has extra duties, like cleaning microwaves and restocking kitchen supplies and dishes.Condition of your room. Your housekeeper will appreciate you for putting trash in the waste bin and, in general, for treating your room like you would your home. But if you leave your hotel room in disarray while on vacation — for…

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    How Much You Should Tip Hotel Housekeeping

    This Is How Much You Should Tip Hotel Housekeeping Amid the Coronavirus Pandemic As hotels reopen, workers are taking on new cleaning protocols. From restaurants and bars to taxis and rideshares, you’re probably used to tipping in a number of situations. On vacation, you likely tip the cab driver who picks you up from the airport, the bellhop who carries your bags to your hotel room, and even room service — but have you ever wondered how much to tip hotel housekeeping? “Over the last 10 years, tipping housekeeping has gone from a nicety to a recommendation to an expectation,” according to Rick Camac, the dean of restaurant and hospitality management at the Institute of Culinary Education, a culinary school that offers programs in hospitality and hotel management. Now more than ever, tipping hotel housekeeping is increasingly important as properties begin to reopen and travel comes back. Bloomberg/Getty Images We’re slowly entering an era of post-COVID-19 travel, and the hospitality industry is making major changes by implementing new procedures to help protect guests and workers from the coronavirus. From luxury resorts like the Four Seasons to Disney World hotels, new health and safety measures, like contactless check-in and socially distant dining, are being put into place to reduce the spread of COVID-19. Hotels are also ramping up housekeeping procedures to ensure rooms are extra clean, so guests can rest assured knowing that all possible precautions have been taken. Hilton recently released its new Hilton CleanStay protocols, which include a deep cleaning of high-touch surfaces in guest rooms, and Marriott announced their Global Cleanliness Council, which introduced new rigorous cleaning methods, including the use of hospital-grade disinfectant and electrostatic sprayers. How Much to Tip Hotel Housekeeping Before COVID-19, Camac recommended leaving $2 per day if “nothing special was done,” and $3 to $5 per day for more work or better service, which could include extra pillows, chocolates, or turndown service. Now that housekeepers will have to work harder to clean guest rooms amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Camac recommends leaving $5 per day, saying it’s “a small price to pay for extra safety and comfort.” He also notes that it’s important to leave a small tip every day rather than a larger tip at the end of your stay because your housekeeper may be different each day. Barcroft Media via Getty Images Unite Here, a union representing workers in the hotel and other industries, takes a similar stance. In a statement shared with Travel + Leisure, they said, “Many of these enhanced standards will mean an increase in workload for union hotel housekeepers…who can clean up to 16 rooms per day — work that is often strenuous and repetitive. In the time of COVID-19, routine, daily room cleaning is essential to protect guests from being infected by coronavirus particles that may enter their room during the course of their stay or spread through a hotel’s ventilation system. Further deep cleaning of each room is needed after checkout to eliminate any virus particles left behind by the previous guest.” Because of these new measures, Unite Here recommends that hotel guests allow housekeeping to clean…

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    What People Get Wrong About Tipping Hotel Housekeepers

    What People Get Wrong About Tipping Hotel HousekeepersHotel guests often interact with a number of staffers ― from valets to bellhops to lobby bartenders. And in these exchanges, it’s common knowledge to tip them accordingly.But there’s one staff category that is often ignored in the tip department due to the fact that the labor often requires less face-to-face time: housekeeping.“I must admit my ignorance,” life etiquette expert Juliet Mitchell, also known as Ms. J, told HuffPost. “When I first started traveling and staying in hotels, I didn’t know that you should tip the housekeeping staff. This, for many, is truly a faux pas borne out of ignorance.”In 2017, The New York Times reported that fewer than a third of hotel guests leave tips for housekeeping staff. And even if they do tip, they may not realize that it’s important to do so for each day of their stay.To help explain the rules around tipping hotel housekeepers, HuffPost spoke to a few etiquette experts. Read on for their guidance.Why it’s important to tip housekeeping staff“You may occasionally pass hotel housekeepers in the hallways, but you rarely see how incredibly hard they work,” Jodi R.R. Smith, president of Mannersmith Etiquette Consulting, told HuffPost. “Rooms must be cleaned, carpets vacuumed, sheets changed, beds made, towels refreshed, bathrooms wiped and trash cans emptied. All of this must be done without disturbing the guests or their belongings — and in a short, and often timed, duration.”The job is also more precarious than you might think. Housekeepers experience the highest injury rates in the industry due to the physically demanding and time-sensitive nature of their work, according to Unite Here, a labor union that represents more than 100,000 hotel workers in North America. Housekeepers also face additional risk of sexual harassment and assault, as the job generally entails working alone in strangers’ rooms.Following the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, many hotels have enhanced their cleaning protocols, which means additional disinfecting tasks for housekeepers. Meanwhile, labor shortages have led to reduced staffing amid a renewed demand for travel. Despite all of this, housekeepers remain some of the lowest-paid employees in the operation.Why you should do it every dayThe standard for hotel housekeeping is to tip every day to ensure the money is going to the specific person servicing your room.“Because housekeeping is a 24/7 position, there are many teams that work in concert to keep each room clean,” Smith said. “There is no guarantee that the housekeeper who cleaned earlier in your stay will be the same one cleaning your room when you check out.”If you wait until the end of your stay to tip or leave it all at the beginning, you risk shortchanging workers.“Imagine you are on vacation for a week,” Smith said. “One housekeeper may have kept your room for the first five days. Then the next housekeeper kept your room for two, yet receives the tip for all seven.”Willie B. Thomas via Getty ImagesMany hotels have changed their cleaning procedures and amenities during the pandemic.During the pandemic, many hotels have switched to an opt-in system for daily room cleaning due to health guidelines and labor shortages. As a result, some guests might think there’s no need to tip housekeepers.But even if you never opt for room cleaning during your stay, you should leave a tip on your departure day, as housekeeping staff will be coming in to clean up after you and disinfect the room before the next guests arrive. With staffing shortages and enhanced cleaning procedures, it’s even more important to show your appreciation for their work.How much money to leaveThe standard amount for housekeeping is $1 to $5 per day, according to a tipping guide from the American Hotel and Lodging Association. But with the ongoing pandemic, Unite Here suggested leaving at least $5.“Tip graciously. There is no set minimum gratuity but if there was ever a time to show generosity and respect, this is it,” said Diane Gottsman, an etiquette expert, the author of “Modern Etiquette for a Better Life” and the founder of The Protocol…

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    How Much Should You Tip Hotel Housekeeping?

    How Much Should You Tip Hotel Housekeeping? – The Family Vacation Guide Most travelers plan trips months ahead to ensure accommodations can be met and to allow time for budgeting. And while the biggest concerns usually include ensuring food, safety, accommodations, there is one thing that may baffle even the most meticulous trip planner. And this is how much to tip hotel housekeepers.  Maintaining a hotel room can be a fairly laborious task, and as a gracious traveler, you want to practice proper etiquette. But as a budget-conscious traveler, you also want to be prepared for every expenditure so that you stay within your financial constraints on the trip. How Much Should You Tip Hotel Housekeepers per Day? The reason hotel housekeeping tips can be a bit perplexing is that their services aren’t necessarily transactional, as is the case with waiters, car valets, or delivery drivers. You usually aren’t in the room when they come to provide their service, so there’s no face-to-face transaction where a tip may be expected.  On average, etiquette consultants recommended tipping hotel housekeepers anywhere between $2 to $5 per day. How has Tipping Etiquette Changed since Covid 19?   Along with many other things in daily life, tipping etiquette has changed during Covid 19. This means that tip-based job positions have been hit especially hard during these times.  Not only are consumers traveling less, but they’re also limiting their outdoor dining and grooming services due to safety concerns and budget constraints–and this often translates to more conservative tips.  What does this mean for you? It means that you’re not alone in your desire to leave a smaller tip than you normally would. So if $2 a day is all you can really afford during your travels, that’s okay. However, you can make things easier for your hotel housekeeper by simply declining housekeeping services every 1 to 2 days. Instead, ask the housekeeper for any towels and other products that you may need.  You can also reduce their workload by performing tasks such as keeping the room tidy, gathering your daily trash and dirty towels and placing them outside your door, and removing the linens from the bed before checking out of the hotel. If you can tip more, you should. Remember that Covid 19 has cost hotels, restaurants, and other brick and mortar businesses to introduce new cleaning and sanitation policies, which means that hotel housekeepers are putting in extra effort to ensure your health and safety.  Considerations for The Tip Amount You should also consider your room and the quality of your service before deciding what tip amount to leave.  Here are a few other things to think about before you open your wallet. The Size of Your Room If you are staying in a large hotel room or an expanded suite, the effort to clean it will be pretty extensive. In some cases, you may have more than one housekeeper. The amount of time to clean your room will be more than your typical 10×12-foot suite. So in this case, adding more to the tip is a great way to show your appreciation for the housekeeper’s services. The Number of People in the Hotel Room If you are sharing your room with multiple people, be sure to account for the extra services that the housekeeper will have to provide during your stay. This often translates into more grooming essentials, towel replenishment, bed turnovers, and more trash to take out each day. So if you’re rooming with one or more people consider adding an extra $2-4 per day if you can.  The Hospitality of the Housekeepers Though you will typically be away while the housekeepers clean the room, you may interact with them at some point during your stay, whether it’s in the afternoon will they come to clean the room or when you’re making a special request.  Friendly and helpful interactions with housekeepers, especially if they’re responding to any additional requests that…

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    What People Get Wrong About Tipping Hotel … – Yahoo News

    What People Get Wrong About Tipping Hotel HousekeepersTipping housekeeping staff every day that your room is serviced is standard protocol. (Photo: simarik via Getty Images)Hotel guests often interact with a number of staffers ― from valets to bellhops to lobby bartenders. And in these exchanges, it’s common knowledge to tip them accordingly.But there’s one staff category that is often ignored in the tip department due to the fact that the labor often requires less face-to-face time: housekeeping.“I must admit my ignorance,” life etiquette expert Juliet Mitchell, also known as Ms. J, told HuffPost. “When I first started traveling and staying in hotels, I didn’t know that you should tip the housekeeping staff. This, for many, is truly a faux pas borne out of ignorance.”In 2017, The New York Times reported that fewer than a third of hotel guests leave tips for housekeeping staff. And even if they do tip, they may not realize that it’s important to do so for each day of their stay.To help explain the rules around tipping hotel housekeepers, HuffPost spoke to a few etiquette experts. Read on for their guidance.Why it’s important to tip housekeeping staff“You may occasionally pass hotel housekeepers in the hallways, but you rarely see how incredibly hard they work,” Jodi R.R. Smith, president of Mannersmith Etiquette Consulting, told HuffPost. “Rooms must be cleaned, carpets vacuumed, sheets changed, beds made, towels refreshed, bathrooms wiped and trash cans emptied. All of this must be done without disturbing the guests or their belongings — and in a short, and often timed, duration.”The job is also more precarious than you might think. Housekeepers experience the highest injury rates in the industry due to the physically demanding and time-sensitive nature of their work, according to Unite Here, a labor union that represents more than 100,000 hotel workers in North America. Housekeepers also face additional risk of sexual harassment and assault, as the job generally entails working alone in strangers’ rooms.Following the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, many hotels have enhanced their cleaning protocols, which means additional disinfecting tasks for housekeepers. Meanwhile, labor shortages have led to reduced staffing amid a renewed demand for travel. Despite all of this, housekeepers remain some of the lowest-paid employees in the operation.Why you should do it every dayThe standard for hotel housekeeping is to tip every day to ensure the money is going to the specific person servicing your room.“Because housekeeping is a 24/7 position, there are many teams that work in concert to keep each room clean,” Smith said. “There is no guarantee that the housekeeper who cleaned earlier in your stay will be the same one cleaning your room when you check out.”If you wait until the end of your stay to tip or leave it all at the beginning, you risk shortchanging workers.“Imagine you are on vacation for a week,” Smith said. “One housekeeper may have kept your room for the first five days. Then the next housekeeper kept your room for two, yet receives the tip for all seven.”Many hotels have changed their cleaning procedures and amenities during the pandemic. (Photo: Willie B. Thomas via Getty Images)During the pandemic, many hotels have switched to an opt-in system for daily room cleaning due to health guidelines and labor shortages. As a result, some guests might think there’s no need to tip housekeepers.But even if you never opt for room cleaning during your stay, you should leave a tip on your departure day, as housekeeping staff will be coming in to clean up after you and disinfect the room before the next guests arrive. With staffing shortages and enhanced cleaning procedures, it’s even more important to show your appreciation for their work.How much money to leaveThe standard amount for housekeeping is $1 to $5 per day, according to a tipping guide from the American Hotel and Lodging…

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    Should You Tip Hotel Housekeeping? How Much?

    Should You Tip Hotel Housekeeping? How Much? The topic of tipping hotel housekeeping can be surprisingly controversial. You have some people who believe housekeeping should be tipped, others who believe housekeeping shouldn’t be tipped, and plenty of people who just aren’t sure what’s expected. In this post I wanted to lay out the arguments on both sides, share my take on tipping, and share general tips on how much you should tip (if you choose to do so). The argument for tipping hotel housekeeping Many people believe that it’s appropriate to tip hotel housekeeping. The logic is as follows: Housekeepers are generally the hardest working and among the lowest paid people in hotelsNot only do they work the hardest, but they arguably have the most disgusting jobs, having to clean up some messy situationsHousekeepers provide customer service, just like hotel concierges, hotel bell staff, or hotel bar and restaurant workers; just because you don’t interact with them doesn’t mean they aren’t serving youTipping hotel housekeeping isn’t an endorsement of the practice of the cost of labor being passed off from hotel owners to guests, but rather is an acknowledgement of these people being underpaid and hard workingHotel housekeepers work really hardThe argument against tipping hotel housekeeping Many people believe that it’s not necessary to tip hotel housekeeping. The logic is as follows: When you book a hotel you’re paying for a clean room, and that’s what housekeeping provides, so that should be a givenIt’s not the job of hotel guests to subsidize the salaries of housekeepers, and hotels should just pay them better wagesThe tipping culture in the United States is terrible, and enough is enoughHotels have cut back housekeeping services, blaming it on the pandemic, and we shouldn’t reward this behaviorWe’ve seen hotel company CEOs suggest that hotel guests should simply tip more to subsidize wages, so why would we support this practice?For some people it’s a matter of “out of sight, out of mind,” as it’s not that they’re not trying to tip, but rather they don’t even think about itAren’t you paying for a clean room when you book a hotel?My stance on tipping hotel housekeeping Personally I very much believe in tipping hotel housekeeping, at least in the United States, which has a general culture of tipping for good customer service (I don’t find it as necessary in other countries, where housekeepers may earn fairer wages, but I play it by ear). Now, just to be clear: Do I like the tipping culture in the United States? Nope…Do I wish hotel housekeeping were paid better wages so I wouldn’t feel compelled to tip? Absolutely…Am I frustrated by the concept of “giving in” to greedy hotel owners who don’t want to pay for their staff? I sure am…Do I think hotel housekeepers have the hardest and most thankless jobs in hotels? Yep…Am I going to punish these hardworking employees who largely have a thankless job just because the system sucks? Nope…I believe in the “live and let live” ideology, so if I have cash on me, I always try to leave a few dollars per day for some of the hardest working people in a hotel. I’m fortunate that a few dollars won’t make a material difference in my financial situation, while I know it can go a long way for many of the people working in hotels. I also think that housekeepers get the short end of the straw of our tipping culture. Whether you like it or not, in the United States there’s an expectation that you tip a taxi driver just for doing their job without them providing any sort of extra service for you. If they should get a tip for not going out of their way, those who work as hard as housekeepers should as well, in my opinion. Now, I have…

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    How Much to Tip the Hotel Housekeeping – Trusted Travel Girl

    How Much to Tip the Hotel Housekeeping — Trusted Travel Girl Tipping is on the rise and we now see tip jars nearly everywhere we do business these days. What’s not new, however, is the unwritten rule of tipping the housekeeping staff of your hotel.That’s right; it’s common courtesy to tip the housekeeping staff, yet many people are seemingly unaware of this. Studies have shown that only about 30% of hotel guests leave a tip for the maid, so we’re helping to spread the word on why and how much to tip housekeeping. In our increasingly cash-less society, it’s important to remember to keep some cash on hand for tipping your hotel staff. Why Should I Tip the Hotel Housekeeping?In an ideal world, everyone would make a living wage, or a wage commensurate with the difficulty of the work being done. Hotel housekeeping staff, or room attendants as they are now called, have incredibly hard jobs for very little compensation. Pay often starts at minimum wage for back-breaking work and difficult hours. There are few breaks during a shift as the hotel needs to turn over rooms as quickly as possible. Between late checkouts, early check-ins, and do-not-disturb signs left out until early afternoon, it is a constant struggle to have the right rooms ready on time and keep hotel guests happy.Some of the job requirements for a room attendant include cleaning, dusting, polishing, and vacuuming. Then there are the linens: changing the sheets and blankets each day, lifting the heavy mattress, and swapping out wet, heavy towels for clean towels. They also have to scrub down the bathroom and restock your toiletries, taking care to keep your personal items as you left them.In more upscale hotels and resorts, you may also have a turndown attendant who gets your room ready for the evening. I dread cleaning my own bathroom once a week; imagine doing this several times each day! How much do I tip the hotel housekeeping? When Should I Tip the Hotel Housekeeping?This is probably the biggest question when it comes to hotel tipping etiquette. In the past, I always tipped at the end of my stay unless I was in a 5 star property. After all, a crisp $20 is better than a few singles here and there, right?That may be true in a very small hotel with a small housekeeping staff. In fact, I’ve noticed envelopes appearing in smaller hotels, telling me the name of my room attendant. In most hotels and resorts, although the housekeeping staff is typically assigned to a section, you can’t be sure if the same person will be servicing your room every single day. For that reason, it’s best to tip a smaller amount each day of your hotel stay, rather than waiting until the end.If you are staying up to a week or more, there’s a good chance you’ll meet your room attendant and you can even ask them if they will be working each day of your stay. However, keep in mind if you wait to tip housekeeping until the end of your stay, you may not be tipping the person who did the most work.Tipping each day is also likely going to net you better service from your room attendant, who will be super appreciative and go out of their way to make sure you have everything you need. And remember to leave a note with the money, indicating it’s for the staff as they should not be in the habit of just picking up any loose money lying around! How Much Should I Tip the Hotel Housekeeping?How much to tip the hotel housekeeping will vary greatly on several factors, but I recommend a minimum of $3-5 per day for a 3.5 star property, $5-20 for anything…

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    How Much SHOULD You Tip The Hotel Housekeeping Staff …

    How Much SHOULD You Tip The Hotel Housekeeping Staff, Since COVID? – Your Mileage May Vary It’s a question that’s been going on for decades – if you stay overnight at a hotel, how much should you tip hotel housekeeping staff? We intended to find out. Tipping, although not limited to the United States, is certainly prevalent here. So much so that websites and publications specifically tell travelers who are not from the USA that tipping certain service people is part of the American culture and even though it’s not done in the country where they live, it’s customary and certainly strongly recommended to do so. Here’s what some well-known publications suggested before COVID: TripAdvisor.co.uk: $2-3 per night up to $5, more in high-end hotels. Also more if there are more than 3 people in a room or suite. CNN Money: $2-$10 per day depending on the quality of the service and the hotel. USA Today: $2 to $5 per night. A $2 to $3 tip is more common for a moderate hotel or smaller room, while $5 is acceptable for luxury accommodations. Give your housekeeper a dollar or two each time he completes an additional service, such as delivering forgotten toiletry items to your room. Traveller.com.au: $2-5 per day depending on the room (more for suites or rooms with kitchen/ettes) left each day of the stay (in case different employees are working). Leave an envelope or note to make it clear the cash is in fact a tip. $1-2 for evening turndown service, left on top of a pillow or with a note. Your Mileage May Vary: Wrote an excellent article on who, what, why, where, when, and how much you should tip EVERYONE, in dozens of countries. Obviously, the amount varies by publication but then again, so do peoples’ thoughts on how much to tip. I’ve seen some non-Americans be almost proud about tipping poorly and, to make matters worse, I was very disappointed to read that about 1/3 of Americans don’t tip housekeeping at all. Back when we hosted a travel group on Facebook (circa 2018 to 2021), we once asked our 23,000+ members, “How much should you tip housekeeping staff?” The vast majority of respondents were Americans and the answers varied from $1 per day to upwards of $5 per day. Two of our respondents worked in hotels. Their responses were, I think, particularly interesting: Zeau M.: As a former hotel Sheraton housekeeper who worked full-time (7am-3pm 5 days/week), I know that maids get paid minimum wage and have to clean up a lot of very nasty stuff each day. (It’s amazing what gross things people will do in hotel rooms when they know they can check out and not have to deal with their disgustingness themselves.) Sheeri Lee H.: I worked at the Super 8 in Wilmington NC and now work at a Hilton. I can verify most housekeepers don’t make more than $8 per hour. And are not full time employees!!! On average our housekeepers work maybe 30-35 hours a…

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