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How to watch your own streaming TV in a hotel



    Lcd Television In Five Star Hotel Room

    Hotel rooms still have televisions, and you can put them to use when traveling. Why use your laptop, smartphone, or tablet when you can watch thing son the bigger screen?

    For the record, we’re talking about reasonably modern TVs with HDMI ports on the back here. Older TVs without HDMI ports will be more trouble.

    Stream From Your Hotel’s Wi-Fi Network With Amazon’s Fire TV

    RELATED: HTG Reviews the Amazon Fire TV Stick: The Most Powerful HDMI Dongle on the Block

    You may want to pack a small streaming stick like the Roku Streaming Stick, Google Chromecast, or Fire TV Stick, or even a larger set-top box like an Apple TV, Roku, or Fire TV.

    That’s a logical idea — streaming sticks especially are good and tiny, so you could throw them in a bag and hook them up to the HDMI port on the back of your TV. However, there’s one big problem here. Most hotels use “captive portals” for their Wi-Fi, forcing you to provide a password or at least click through a terms of service to connect. These set-top boxes haven’t been designed with this in mind, so there’s been no way to connect most of them to a typical hotel Wi-Fi network.

    Amazon recently updated their Fire TV products with support for such captive portals. if you want a small stick you can use to stream content from your hotel’s Wi-Fi network to its TV, Amazon’s Fire TV products are the ones to get. Hopefully other manufacturers (like Google with their Chromecast) will add this feature to their products, too.

    Bring an HDMI Cable

    RELATED: Why You Should Connect a PC to Your TV (Don’t Worry; It’s Easy!)

    The low-tech way is often the easiest. There’s always the option of getting an HDMI cable, hooking it up to your laptop’s HDMI port or Mini DisplayPort with the appropriate connector, and then plugging it in to the HDMI port you’ll find on the back of your hotel’s television. You can then play anything on your laptop and mirror it on the TV. If you have video files downloaded to your laptop, you can just play them locally and mirror them onto the TV without any Internet connection required. If the hotel offers an Internet connection, you can connect on your laptop and play YouTube, Netflix, or anything else.

    Because this doesn’t involve anything wireless, it should just work. There’s just the matter of carrying around an HDMI cable with you and having to fiddle with your laptop.

    Use Miracast for Wireless Streaming (No Wi-Fi Connection Required)

    RELATED: What is Miracast and Why Should I Care?

    Miracast should be the best option here, if only this standard could get off the ground and work reliably. In Miracast’s vision of the future, all those TVs you encounter in a hotel room will eventually have Miracast built in, and you’ll be able to wirelessly stream to them with just a few clicks or taps. Miracast is integrated into Android, Windows 8.1, and Windows Phone, assuming you have the appropriate hardware. Miracast is like a wireless HDMI cable — it streams the exact contents of your display to the TV.

    This would actually be an excellent solution because Miracast works over Wi-Fi Direct. If you have a Miracast dongle, you can plug it into the TV’s HDMI port and stream your smartphone, tablet, or laptop’s display wirelessly. The Miracast dongle itself doesn’t have to connect to a Wi-Fi network.

    Microsoft’s Wireless Display Adapter is a well-reviewed solution for this, but it’s more expensive than a Fire TV Stick that comes with a remote — so you may want to skip the hacky MIracast solutions and just pick up one of those. Roku’s Streaming Stick also recently gained Miracast support.

    Be sure your laptop, tablet, or smartphone supports Miracast, too. Be aware that Miracast has had a lot of reliability issues, although some people report that modern dongles and devices are working more reliably.

    microsoft wireless display adapter for miracast

    Most Other Streaming Devices Need a Smartphone Hotspot

    If you’re willing to use your smartphone’s hotspot feature, that can also provide an option. This is basically the only way to connect a Chromecast, Roku, Apple TV, or another device to wireless Internet in a typical hotel. Obviously, enabling mobile data and streaming content from the Internet will use quite a bit of data, and that will count as tethering data — we hope you have a good amount of tethering data and possibly an unlimited mobile data plan. This probably won’t be a realistic solution for anyone, as video services use a lot of bandwidth and most mobile data plans just aren’t that generous.

    Yes, it’s silly that you’d have to connect a Chromecast or similar device to cellular Internet when your hotel has perfectly good Wi-Fi, but Chromecasts and other devices just can’t connect to them. Hopefully other manufacturers will get their acts together and more devices will support those captive portals.

    On the other hand, if you luck out and end up in a hotel that offers a Wi-Fi network that “just works” without those obnoxious passwords and click-throughs, any streaming device will be able to connect and work just fine.


    So, what should most people do? If you frequently want to stream content to your TV in a hotel and use its Wi-Fi network, we recommend getting a Fire TV Stick. if you’re willing to potentially struggle with issues and have modern, Miracast-capable devices, a Miracast dongle will work well and won’t even require an Internet connection. And an HDMI cable you can connect to your laptop will always work in a pinch.

    If you do pack a streaming stick or another HDMI dongle, be sure to unplug it from the TV and take it with you when you leave!

    Image Credit: Alan Levine on FlickrMartin @pokipsie Rechsteiner on Flickr

    FAQs

    Can I mirror to a hotel TV?

    Miracast provides 1:1 screen mirroring on many Android and Windows devices. Miracast is built into all current hotel TVs. UPnP/DLNA is the third wireless possibility for mirroring images and videos from a mobile device to a TV. A wired alternative is to use an HDMI cable.

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    How do you stream movies at a hotel?

    Marriott has signed a deal with Netflix, which is an industry first. You just log into your account to watch Netflix shows and movies right on your hotel television. The Amazon Fire TV and Fire TV Stick, which are streaming media players, have been updated so they can now stream content over public Wi-Fi

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    Can you stream from a hotel?

    While some cutting-edge hotels offer smart TVs, through which you can log in to your streaming services, these aren’t exactly widespread. There’s an easy way to get your own content on the hotel’s TV, though; bring your own streaming device to plug into the hotel’s TV

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    How do I bypass hotel mode on my TV?

    You can still stream your phone to a hotel TV even if you don’t have a streaming stick. You will need an HDMI plug that has an HDMI plug on one side and a USB one on the other. Once you plug the USB end into your mobile and the HDMI one to the TV, anything displayed on your phone screen will be mirrored on the TV one.

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    How can I cast my phone to a hotel TV?

    All you have to do is download the service’s Hotel Cast app for iOS and Android and connect to the hotel’s WiFi to start streaming your own Netflix, Hulu and other Cast-enabled apps.

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    How can I watch Netflix from my phone to my hotel TV?

    Quadriga has introduced technology to let guests stream content wirelessly from their iOS devices onto the in-room HD TV by using Airplay from Apple. Once the device is connected to the hotel’s Wi-Fi network, guests just have to tap the Airplay icon in their mobile app. The TV will then mirror the mobile device screen.

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    Can you airplay to a hotel TV?

    Are my personal details safe if I enter my Netflix account at a hotel? Watching Netflix on the TV of your hotel room does not entail any risk, since all the information you enter to log in is automatically cleared up as soon as you check out.

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    Can you airplay to a hotel TV?

    Connect Your Roku Using a Mobile Hotspot

    Make sure to connect your device to Wi-Fi. Connect the device to the hotel or dorm’s Wi-Fi. Set up a hotspot on your iOS device, Android device, Windows 10 computer, or Mac.

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    Can you hook up a Roku to a hotel TV?

    Once the device is connected to the hotel’s Wi-Fi network, guests just have to tap the Airplay icon in their mobile app. The TV will then mirror the mobile device screen. Guests can check their e-mail, look at photos, and play games on the TV.

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    How can I connect my iphone to a hotel TV?

    If you’re at a hotel with an open Wi-Fi network and no required login, plug your Chromecast into the TV and set it up on the Wi-Fi network. Otherwise, the easiest method is to create a Windows 10 hotspot. Chromecast can connect to it because there’s no welcome page needed.

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    Can you use a Chromecast in a hotel?

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    How can I watch Netflix from my phone to my hotel TV?

    Once the device is connected to the hotel’s Wi-Fi network, guests just have to tap the Airplay icon in their mobile app. The TV will then mirror the mobile device screen.

    (Get More Info)

    Can I cast Netflix to a hotel TV?

    AirDroid Cast is a free screen mirroring app and also a control solution that is both powerful and simple to use. Broadcast Android and iOS screens on a bigger screen, or use a PC to gain complete control of all these portable devices.

    (Get More Info)

    Is there a free app for screen mirroring?

    Use an Android to HDMI connector (Android)

    All you’ll need to do is to plug the USB cable into your phone and plug the HDMI end into the HDMI plug on your smart TV. That way, you can cast your phone to a TV without a WiFi connection.

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    How can I stream from my phone to my TV without Wi-Fi?

    Try these steps first

    Make sure that your AirPlay-compatible devices are turned on and near each other. Check that the devices are updated to the latest software and are on the same Wi-Fi network. Restart the devices that you want to use with AirPlay or screen mirroring.

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    Part of a video titled How to Screen Cast and Mirror a Phone to TV – YouTube

    The Apple Lightning Connector links your iPhone’s bottom port to an HDMI cable. Connect the device to your phone’s Lightning port, attach an HDMI cable to your TV, then plug the HDMI cable into the Lightning Connector, and your screen is instantly mirrored to your TV.

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    How to watch your own streaming TV in a hotel – TechRadar

    How to watch your own streaming TV in a hotel Home How-to Televisions The tips, the streaming sticks and the techniques to taking over a hotel room’s massive screen Most hotel rooms have big TVs. Most never get used. It’s late, you’ve got jet-lag, and all you want to do is watch a movie in your hotel room. So why are you sitting on the bed craning at a tablet or, worse, a four-inch phone held up to your face – especially when there’s a 50-inch LED TV sitting idle right in front of you. By cabling-up or wirelessly mirroring your phone on the big screen, or streaming to it using a streaming stick, it’s possible to bring a hotel room TV under your influence. Here are your options.  Check for USB slots When most people get into a hotel room they check-out the bathroom and see if there’s a power point near the bed to charge-up their phone. Now you can add another task; check the sides (or round the back) of the room’s TV for USB slots. Sadly, some made-for-hotels TVs don’t have any, at least none that are functional (the pricier the hotel, the less likely you are to find them), but you’ve a 50/50 chance. Cheaper hotels and AirBnB places are much more likely to have regular living room TVs, with USB slots. You then just change the live input to USB using the remote and pray to the God of format decoders that the TV’s software plays nicely with the file formats you have on the stick. Light travelers will prefer a keyring-style USB stick that’s easy to carry around, but if you’re planning a long trip, Kingston’s brand new DataTraveler Ultimate GT USB stick (opens in new tab) might appeal. It holds a stunning 2TB of files; that’s well over 2,000 hours of video.  Check for HDMI slots Even if you don’t find a USB slot, the chances are that a TV in a hotel room will have a spare HDMI slot. No, we’re not going to recommend you start travelling with a Blu-ray player (though some are getting small enough). If you have content on your phone that you want to watch or listen to, an empty HDMI slot means you can get hold of either a Mobile High-Definition Link (MHL)-ready micro USB-to-HDMI adapter (for Android devices) or Apple’s 30-pin Digital AV Adapter (for an iPhone or iPad), respectively. However, since you also then have to travel with a HDMI cable, the better option is to go wireless and start travelling with a streaming stick. Luckily, there is a travel-friendly trio to choose from. More on them shortly… Look for free, unsecured Wi-Fi OK, so unsecured Wi-Fi networks are not great if you’re working with military or industrial secrets, but for a streaming stick to work in hotel room, that’s what you’re after. Online forms = bad. This might seem like overkill, but if you know the hotel you’re going to visit has fussy, secured Wi-Fi, but it also has wired Ethernet connections in the room (there are some left that do), taking along a Wi-Fi router may make things a lot easier. So which stick should you buy? Probably not Google’s brand new ChromeCast Ultra, which increases the resolution from 1080p to 4K HDR; that might be too much for free Wi-Fi in most hotels. But there are plenty of basic streaming sticks to choose from.  Choosing a streaming stick Although they all work slightly differently, choosing between the big three streaming sticks is largely a matter of content, and geography. All three support Netflix, YouTube and Spotify, and all three need to be connected to the TV via HDMI, but…

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    Stream Movies in Your Hotel Room – Insider

    You can stream your own entertainment to your hotel’s TV with these 3 devices The Insider Picks team writes about stuff we think you’ll like. Business Insider has affiliate partnerships, so we get a share of the revenue from your purchase. Roku Here’s a nifty trick for enjoying your own on-demand entertainment on your hotel’s TV anytime you travel.Whenever you stay in a hotel — whether you’re traveling for for business or vacation — chances are you often find yourself with some downtime. During work trips you might have your evenings to yourself, and when you’re on vacation, you’ll probably want s chance to recharge between excursions and adventures.Aside from reading, you can always watch whatever TV channels the hotel gets, or stream on your laptop, but it’s so much nicer and more comfortable to watch your latest Netflix obsession on your room’s big television, instead of propping up your computer or iPad in bed. While some cutting-edge hotels offer smart TVs, through which you can log in to your streaming services, these aren’t exactly widespread.There’s an easy way to get your own content on the hotel’s TV, though; bring your own streaming device to plug into the hotel’s TV. You can either bring the same device you use at home, or you can buy a new inexpensive one dedicated for travel.It’s easy to set up: Just connect it to the TV’s HDMI port, plug in the power adapter, and connect to Wi-Fi. Just like that, you’re good to go. You’ll only need to log in to your various services once; every other time you check into a hotel and bring your device, it will still be logged in to all of your accounts.Here are a few of the best — and most portable — options for streaming Netflix, Hulu, and other programming to your hotel room’s TV.You may notice that Google’s Chromecast isn’t on the list — unfortunately, that device can be a bit tricky to use in hotels. The Chromecast doesn’t always work well with Wi-Fi networks that require a you to enter information, such as a username or room number, on a web-based form — unfortunately, that’s common for hotel networks. That means you that you might bring your Chromecast on a long trip and plug it in, only to find out you can’t get it to work. The Amazon Fire TV Stick Amazon If you’re at all invested in the Amazon digital media ecosystem, then look no further — this device can stream everything you’ll need in a small package and at a great price.The Amazon Fire TV Stick looks like a beefy USB drive, except it has an HDMI plug sticking out so that you can plug it directly into the TV. The only cable you’ll need is a power cord.The Fire TV Stick offers streaming from a ton of services including Netflix, Hulu, HBO, Showtime, Starz, and, of course, Amazon Prime Video. You can also stream Prime Music through the TV. If you have a subscription to DirectTV Now or Sling TV, you can even stream certain live channels and sports — although chances are your hotel’s TV gets those channels already.The latest version of the Fire TV Stick comes programmed with Amazon’s Alexa service, which you can use through the included remote control. You can tell Alexa to play a certain show, open an app, order a pizza, search for something, or more. If you’re using the Fire TV Stick at home, you can configure it to work with other Amazon Echo devices.If you do plan to use the device at home and you have a 4K television, you can also consider the slightly larger regular Fire TV.Click here to buy the Amazon Fire TV Stick for $39.99 The Roku Streaming Stick Amazon The Roku Streaming Stick has a similar design to the Amazon Fire TV…

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    How to connect Chromecast to a hotel TV

    How to Stream Videos and Music to the TV In Your Hotel Room

    How to Stream Videos and Music to the TV In Your Hotel Room Hotel rooms still have televisions, and you can put them to use when traveling. Why use your laptop, smartphone, or tablet when you can watch thing son the bigger screen? For the record, we’re talking about reasonably modern TVs with HDMI ports on the back here. Older TVs without HDMI ports will be more trouble. Stream From Your Hotel’s Wi-Fi Network With Amazon’s Fire TV RELATED: HTG Reviews the Amazon Fire TV Stick: The Most Powerful HDMI Dongle on the Block You may want to pack a small streaming stick like the Roku Streaming Stick, Google Chromecast, or Fire TV Stick, or even a larger set-top box like an Apple TV, Roku, or Fire TV. That’s a logical idea — streaming sticks especially are good and tiny, so you could throw them in a bag and hook them up to the HDMI port on the back of your TV. However, there’s one big problem here. Most hotels use “captive portals” for their Wi-Fi, forcing you to provide a password or at least click through a terms of service to connect. These set-top boxes haven’t been designed with this in mind, so there’s been no way to connect most of them to a typical hotel Wi-Fi network. Amazon recently updated their Fire TV products with support for such captive portals. if you want a small stick you can use to stream content from your hotel’s Wi-Fi network to its TV, Amazon’s Fire TV products are the ones to get. Hopefully other manufacturers (like Google with their Chromecast) will add this feature to their products, too. Bring an HDMI Cable RELATED: Why You Should Connect a PC to Your TV (Don’t Worry; It’s Easy!) The low-tech way is often the easiest. There’s always the option of getting an HDMI cable, hooking it up to your laptop’s HDMI port or Mini DisplayPort with the appropriate connector, and then plugging it in to the HDMI port you’ll find on the back of your hotel’s television. You can then play anything on your laptop and mirror it on the TV. If you have video files downloaded to your laptop, you can just play them locally and mirror them onto the TV without any Internet connection required. If the hotel offers an Internet connection, you can connect on your laptop and play YouTube, Netflix, or anything else. Because this doesn’t involve anything wireless, it should just work. There’s just the matter of carrying around an HDMI cable with you and having to fiddle with your laptop. Use Miracast for Wireless Streaming (No Wi-Fi Connection Required) RELATED: What is Miracast and Why Should I Care? Miracast should be the best option here, if only this standard could get off the ground and work reliably. In Miracast’s vision of the future, all those TVs you encounter in a hotel room will eventually have Miracast built in, and you’ll be able to wirelessly stream to them with just a few clicks or taps. Miracast is integrated into Android, Windows 8.1, and Windows Phone, assuming you have the appropriate hardware. Miracast is like a wireless HDMI cable — it streams the exact contents of your display to the TV. This would actually be an excellent solution because Miracast works over Wi-Fi Direct. If you have a Miracast dongle, you can plug it into the TV’s HDMI port and stream your smartphone, tablet, or laptop’s display wirelessly. The Miracast dongle itself doesn’t have to connect to a Wi-Fi network. Microsoft’s Wireless Display Adapter is a well-reviewed solution for this, but it’s more expensive than a Fire TV Stick that comes with a remote — so you may want to skip the hacky MIracast solutions and just pick up one of those. Roku’s Streaming Stick also recently gained Miracast support. Be sure your…

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    More hotels will let you watch your own Netflix – Engadget

    More hotels will let you watch your own NetflixStayCast, a Google Chromecast-powered service for hotels, could fulfill your dream of being able to watch whatever you want to as a guest — especially now that it’s become much easier to get. AT&T has just announced that hotels can get DirectTV HD systems pre-loaded with StayCast, so make sure to look around or ask if you can stream your own stuff if the property offers the carrier’s satellite TV service. All you have to do is download the service’s Hotel Cast app for iOS and Android and connect to the hotel’s WiFi to start streaming your own Netflix, Hulu and other Cast-enabled apps. An interactive content provider called Sonifi Solutions first launched StayCast as Sonicast in April 2016. The service has only recently become more available, though, thanks to the company’s various partnerships. Back in April, hotel chain titan Hyatt revealed that StayCast now comes integrated with the World of Hyatt mobile app. In fact, 14 Hyatt locations already offer the service, which means you can use the hotel’s app to watch your favorite shows on the in-room TV at any of them, including Hyatt Regency New Orleans. In May, Samsung began offering hotels its Hospitality TVs that have StayCast integration, as well. You can simply pair your phone with the TV and continue marathoning that series you were watching at home. It’ll probably take a while before most hotels start providing a way for you watch your own stuff instead of forcing you to rent overpriced movies. Going forward, though, you can at least keep an eye out for services like StayCast and for any deals streaming services like Netflix cut with hotel chains.All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. All prices are correct at the time of publishing.

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    How to connect your Chromecast to a hotel TV | Digital Trends

    How to connect your Chromecast to a hotel TV | Digital Trends While booking a room for the weekend at a favorite destination can be a welcome retreat, there are a few amenities you may be disappointed to find your room doesn’t come with. The absence of a microwave or kitchenette can be a nuisance, as well as various toiletries, but then there’s the lack of available streaming media, too. Many hotels only offer basic cable for guests, leaving many of us without access to our treasured Netflix or Hulu subscription. Fortunately, if you’ve got your hands on a Google Chromecast or a Chromecast with Google TV, you can overcome this shortcoming pretty easily. Here’s how. Google This first step is critical. The TV in your hotel room has to have an open HDMI port that you can access (many of them don’t), otherwise it’s game over. While you’re looking, take note to see if there’s already an HDMI cable plugged into the TV. If there is, you might need to unplug it in one of the next steps. Once a free port has been found, plug your Chromecast in. Step 1: Check the sides of the TV, or if you can access it, around the back. The inputs should be clearly labeled as HDMI 1, HDMI 2, etc. Step 2: Plug your Chromecast into the HDMI port. It doesn’t really matter which one — just make a note of whether it’s HDMI 1, HDMI 2, etc. Step 3: Plug the power cable into your Chromecast, and the other end into the wall wart. (It’s possible the TV’s USB port may work. Or it may not if it doesn’t provide the Chromecast enough juice.) Pro tip: bring an extra-long USB power cable in case there isn’t a free wall outlet near the TV. Step 4: Change the input on the TV to match the one you plugged the Chromecast into. (You remembered to remember, right?) If you’re successful, you should see the default Chromecast setup screen. If you have trouble switching inputs (maybe because the TV simply won’t allow it), it’s time to try plan B. If you found a cable already plugged into an HDMI port in step 1, unplug it, and swap in your Chromecast. Of course, this means you’ll lose your hotel TV channels, but you can always swap it back once you’ve finished bingeing Stranger Things. Keep in mind that many hotel chains will purchase HDTVs that are connected to the hotel’s own media servers. In many cases, this means that the HDMI ports on the TV may be locked. So even if there are one or two ports available to connect your Chromecast into, the inputs themselves may not work. If you run into this issue, there’s a quick workaround you can try. Look at the back of the TV. If you see a cable that looks like an Ethernet wire connected to the TV, go ahead and disconnect it. This is the data stream wire (or RJ11 cable) that the hotel uses to deliver cable streams to each TV. Once this wire is disconnected, you should be able to use the TV’s HDMI inputs. Google Connect to the internetIf you’ve gotten this…

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    Streaming Services for Hotels: How to get Netflix on the hotel TV

    Streaming Services for Hotels: How to get Netflix on the hotel TV by Filip Hector 12 min read | Last updated: 23.9.2020 In case you hadn’t noticed yet, the next-level guest experience requires more than just regular hotel TV with linear TV channels for entertainment. Guests want to consume entertainment like they do at home, which means that they want in-room streaming of tv shows and movies, more than they want to rent content, or god forbid… watch cable. Don’t get me wrong, linear TV is still a necessity and many guests prefer regular broadcasts and don’t necessarily have time to binge-watch Tiger King during their stay. But, if you want the guests at your hotel to have that modern and luxurious, while still comfortable home-like experience, then you need in-room streaming. So in this post you will learn the following about streaming services for hotels: Why in-room streaming is vital for hotel entertainment Why you should consider Netflix over other streaming services in your hotel How to get Netflix (and other streaming services) into your hotel rooms If you already know how important streaming is for in-room entertainment and want to know what your options are, I suggest you jump directly to the part about how to provide in-room streaming and Netflix in your hotel. Providing BYOC (Bring Your Own Content) services isn’t exclusively for luxury brands or big chains, if that’s what you think. It’s available for any hotel, regardless of size, location or guest profiles. It’s not just an add-on service either, only to be considered if it can be squeezed into the budget. It might actually be one of the most affordable options for in-room entertainment in the long run. As the title and the list above says, I will cover mainly two topics in this post. Why you should provide in-room streaming (and especially Netflix) for your hotel guests and how you can go about providing it. Okay, let’s start with the why and the importance of streaming in today’s hotel entertainment. Why in-room streaming is vital for hotel entertainment There is a simple answer to this question; it’s where the video entertainment market is moving, meaning that it’s what most of your guests want. People have their own content at the ready and they want to watch it whenever and wherever they want, simple as that. So I’m sure most of you know this by now, but if not; In-room streaming should be among the top contenders for entertainment services that you are considering. Global usage of cable and satellite subscriptions have been going down for years as consumers are cancelling their pay-tv services at an increasing rate and completely switching to subscription-based OTT (over-the-top) streaming services, also known as subscription video on demand (SVOD), such as Netflix, Disney, Amazon Prime, HBO, Hulu and the like. Popular streaming services among consumers. This has even become a phenomenon you might have heard of known as cord-cutting. Referring to the act of “cutting the cord” to your cable or satellite TV provider and instead streaming your content from the internet via IPTV or OTT. So, SVOD is becoming the norm, or already is actually. For example, Netflix surpassed cable pay-tv providers in the U.S. already in 2017 by number of subscribers and they have just kept growing, adding more original content on the way that compel more and more consumers to turn to streaming. It’s not just the giants contributing to the growth, new domestic streaming services are popping up all over the globe all the time, while some media powerhouses have just recently entered the streaming arena, like Disney with their OTT streaming service Disney+ landing in (the rest) of Europe only last week, a year after the initial launch in the U.S. The global number of total SVOD subscriptions is being estimated…

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