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What to see in tower of london

    What can we see at the Tower of London?

    Your Tower of London admission ticket includes the Crown Jewels, the ravens, the public outside areas of the Tower of London, Tower Green, White Tower, including Line of Kings, and Armoury in Action, Bloody Tower, Medieval Palace, Battlements (excluding Martin Tower), Torture at the Tower exhibition and Fusiliers …

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    How much time do you need at the Tower of London?

    Most people who choose to visit the Tower of London will spend at least 15-30 minutes in line waiting to see the Crown Jewels. Plan on setting aside at least 45-60 minutes for the entire experience. Many visitors recommend setting aside at least 3 hours to see the entirety of the Tower of London.

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    Is the Tower of London worth seeing?

    The majority of travelers say the Tower of London’s high admission price and long lines are worth every pence. They also regard it as fascinating for people of all ages. And some recent visitors strongly recommend attending the free tour put on by the Yeoman Warders.

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    What is the Tower of London famous for?

    The Tower of London is a 900-year-old castle and fortress in central London that is notable for housing the crown jewels and for holding many famous and infamous prisoners

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    Can you see the Crown Jewels in the Tower of London?

    Under guard and still in use

    You’ll find the Crown Jewels under armed guard in the Jewel House at the Tower of London. These gems are a unique working collection of royal regalia and are still regularly used by The Queen for important national ceremonies, such as the State Opening of Parliament.

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    What is the best time to visit the Tower of London?

    The most suitable time to visit the Tower of London will be during a weekday. Since it is a popular attraction in London, we recommend you to arrive early in the morning or slightly late in the afternoon even on weekdays. The crowds are expected the most during weekends and even on weekdays after 3 pm.

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    Can you walk across Tower Bridge for free?

    It is totally free to walk across the bridge. You can also time your walk to coincide with the lifting of the drawbridge. Both are top free things to do in London.

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    What is the best day to visit the Tower of London?

    Best Times to Visit

    The best time to visit is definitely during a weekday, but even then you should probably arrive early in the morning or later in the afternoon. The largest crowds will generally start to thin out after 15:00 (3:00 pm) in the afternoon on weekdays.

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    Can you visit Tower of London for free?

    Tickets and prices

    Tower of London only ticket prices (excl donation): Members: Free. Adult: £29.90. Child: £14.90.

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    Are the Crown Jewels in Tower of London real?

    The question most visitors ask about the Crown Jewels is, ‘are they real?’ Yes, they are! Coronation portrait of Queen Elizabeth II, 2 June 1953. The Queen wears the Imperial State Crown, 1937 and holds the Sovereign’s Sceptre with Cross, 1661 and Sovereign’s Orb, 1661.

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    Why can’t you take pictures of the Crown Jewels?

    Arguably the most prized feature is the Jewel House, which has housed the exquisite Crown Jewels since 1661. Sadly, you can’t take photos of the Crown Jewels for security reasons. And with the intimidating security guards watching your every move as you walk through the Jewel House, you won’t want to even try.

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    Are the Crown Jewels worth seeing?

    The Crown Jewels are powerful symbols of the British monarchy. They also hold deep religious & cultural significance to the nation’s history. The Imperial State Crown which Queen Elizabeth II wore to her coronation was on display.

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    Where is Queen Elizabeth’s crown kept?

    The Crown Jewels are the most famous of the nation’s treasures. Kept under the watchful eye of the Yeoman Warders at the Tower of London, they constitute the most complete collection of royal regalia in the world.

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    Who is the real owner of Kohinoor diamond?

    Kohinoor is now part of the British Monarch, Queen Elizabeth. It is currently on public display in the Jewel House at the Tower of London, seen by millions of visitors each day. Kohinoor Diamond was ceded to Queen Victoria after the annexation of Punjab by the British in 1849.

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    Who can touch the Crown Jewels?

    There are strict rules surrounding the crown jewels, and only three people in the world are allowed to touch them: the current monarch (that’s now King Charles III), the Archbishop of Canterbury and the crown jeweler. For more than 800 years, the crown jewels have lived in the Tower of London.

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    Can India bring back Kohinoor?

    “If a diplomatic call needs to be taken (to bring back Kohinoor), it would be taken by the Indian government or External Affairs Ministry at the right time? the Culture Ministry will not take any initiative (to get back the diamond),” Sharma had said.

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    How much Kohinoor is worth?

    Even if the value of the Kohinoor diamond is not known, it is part of the Crown Jewels, and the whole value of the Crown Jewels is between $10 and $12 billion. The Kohinoor is definitely one of the more expensive diamonds in the collection.

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    What is The Queen’s Favourite Colour?

    Revealed: Why blue is the Queen’s favourite colour… and why she doesn’t like beige. Many have wondered what Her Majesty’s favourite colour is – until now. Vogue magazine has studied every outfit she has worn in the last 12 months and found that blue is known as royal for a reason.

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    Where can I see Kohinoor diamond in London?

    It was transferred to the Crown of Queen Mary in 1911, and finally to the Crown of Queen Elizabeth (later known as the Queen Mother) in 1937 for her coronation as Queen consort. Today, the diamond is on public display in the Jewel House at the Tower of London.

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